My Cart

Close

In Functional Medicine,  inflammation is viewed as the precursor to many lifestyle-related, chronic diseases. Prolonged inflammation causes conditions like allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease, asthma, heart disease, obesity, diabetes type 2, dementia, depression and certain cancers. The reason is that inflammation leads to premature ageing from the inside out. This is called 'inflammaging'!

The good news is that inflammation can be managed and prevented.

Take our INFLAMMATION QUIZ and receive a free copy of the MITO-FOOD PLAN.

Why should you be preventing chronic inflammation?

Listen to Dr Mark Hyman explain 'what' is inflammation and 'why' it is important to ensure that your body is not in a chronically inflamed state. 

He highlights the difference between acute inflammation (an injury, a sore throat or a headache) versus chronic, low-grade inflammation and 'how' it plays a role in the development of many lifestyle-related chronic diseases. 

The IL Inflammation Pathway

The 'poop' chart

The 'poop' chart

The Bristol Stool Chart is a great tool for you and your family to self-monitor the quality of your diet and the state of your GUT!

Most Functional Medicine practitioners encourage their clients to 'turn around and examine their poop' as it a great way of determining whether you have leaky gut issues with inflammation, or not eating enough fiber daily. 

Ideally, we should all be 'pooping snakes' at least 2-3 times DAILY!

LEARN MORE

Key genes involved in inflammation.

The 12 therapeutic foods for inflammation:

There are 12 therapeutic foods or nutrients recommended by the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM). These foods and their nutrients form the basis of an anti-inflammatory diet. It is recommended that these foods are consumed from organic farming. 

If you can't ADD IN these foods, and their nutrients daily, then it is a good idea to supplement from the list below.

Food Source  Anti-inflammatory Benefits Nutrients
1. Almonds 
Research shows that by eating a handful of raw, organic almonds daily can help to reduce chronic disease risk. Almonds contain chemicals that are the building blocks of neurotransmitters, which are vital for memory and attention.
  • Monounsaturated fats
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Phytonutrients
  • Vitamin E
  • Glutathione
2. Avocado
Often referred to as the ultimate brain food, avos are a healthy source of 'good' fats. 
The monounsaturated fat contained in avocados also increases your body’s ability to absorb the phytonutrients in other fruits and vegetables that provide antioxidant protection.
  • Monounsaturated fats
  • Potassium
  • Glutathione
  • Vitamin E
  • Phytonutrients
  • Antioxidants
3. Grass-fed Beef
Meat from grass-fed beef is quite different from meat from conventionally raised animals. It is a great source of anti-inflammatory 

omega-3 fats, since the animals graze on grass and other wild plants. Meat from grass-fed beef is also higher in vitamin E and antioxidants and lower in saturated fat than meat from grain-fed animals.

  • Omega 3
  • Vitamin E
  • Antioxidants
  • Amino Acids
4. Blueberries
These are an excellent source of fiber and potent antioxidants that have been shown to improve memory and cognition.Their powerful antioxidants may improve blood flow in the brain while protecting it from free radical damage. 
  • Fiber
  • Antioxidants
  • Phytonutrients
5. 
Broccoli (and all cruciferous vegetables)
These include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, kale, collard greens, turnips, arugula, watercress, bok choy (Chinese cabbage), kohlrabi, radishes, and daikon. They are associated with reduced markers for degenerative damage in the nervous system, slowing and even reversing age-related declines in brain function and cognitive performance. Broccoli and other crucifers contain sulforaphane, which helps protect the brain from excessive inflammation by helping ramp up the production of glutathione.
  • Sulforaphane
  • Glutathione
6. 
Coconut Oil (virgin, organic

 Coconut oil can be helpful in raising “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while lowering the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. More importantly, coconuts are a rich source of a brain “super fuel” known as beta-hydroxybutyrate.

  • Beta-hydroxybutyrate
7. Green Tea
Contains powerful antioxidants that may decrease oxidative damage to the mitochondria in the brain. Research has shown that, aside from helping to prevent cancer and heart disease, green tea offers protection from the development of Parkinson’s disease and other brain disorders.The tannins and polyphenols of green tea help the body regulate insulin sensitivity while helping the brain maintain a steady supply of glucose, help to create a positive mood, and may prevent brain damage after strokes and other brain injuries by assisting the body’s DNA repair system
  • Polyphenols
8. Pomegranate seeds

Pomegranates antioxidants with additional anti-inflammatory benefits. The seeds (arils) are high in fiber and are a good source of vitamin C and potassium. They are also a significant source of those polyphenols that are important in brain health.

  • Fiber
  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Polyphenols
9. Wild Alaskan Salmon
Wild Alaskan salmon is a significant source of DHA, the omega-3 fat that is one of the keys to a healthy brain. Studies have shown that those who eat more fish high in DHA exhibit better brain health. Wild salmon also contains a powerful carotenoid that gives salmon its distinctive color and acts as an antioxidant. The body’s production of glutathione is dependent on the amino acid cysteine, which is supplied by salmon. Additionally, wild salmon is a good source of CoQ10, another potent antioxidant that participates in the production of cellular energy. Always avoid farm-raised salmon that are grown in pens and fed artificial coloring to create the orange color, as well as a meal containing chemicals associated with cancer and reproductive problems. Farm-raised salmon often contain PCBs, mercury, and other contaminants that may lead to chronic illness and inflammation.
  • Cysteine
  • CoQ10
  • omega 3 DHA
10. 
Olive oil (cold-pressed, unfiltered/cloudy, extra-virgin)
Contains protective antioxidant phytonutrients called polyphenols that also confer anti-inflammatory benefits. Olive oil should be labeled “cold-pressed” and “extra-virgin.” It is green in color, has a stronger flavor, and is the result of the crushing of the olives, the most nutrient-rich. Virgin olive oil comes from the second pressing, is lighter in color, and confers fewer bene ts than extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO).When possible, purchase a less-processed, unfiltered (cloudy) olive oil. Store your olive oil in an airtight, dark glass container.
  • Phytonutrients
  • Polyphenols
12. Spinach
Green leafy vegetables contain many antioxidants that help with improving memory and cognition. Spinach, in particular, is also high in carotenoids and flavonoids that provide anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer antioxidant protection.
  • Antioxidants
  • Carotenoids
  • Flavonoids

Hello You!

Join our mailing list